For Teachers

"We acquire language when we understand messages, when we understand what people tell us and when we understand what we read."
—Stephen Krashen

These videos are intended to be a source of comprehensible input for English language learners. As an adult ESL teacher, I have always been frustrated by how difficult it is to find videos online for my students to watch. My students always want to do more listening, but it can be difficult to find sources of aural input that are both understandable and interesting to students. Many of the videos on YouTube or other websites are very difficult for ESL students to understand and can cause feelings of frustration, which consequently decreases their motivation to learn. But this website is a place where English language learners can come to find easy, comprehensible videos on topics they enjoy.

If you are an ESL teacher, I hope this website will be useful to you and your students. These videos could be used during class time as a way to teach students about a particular topic. Or, you could simply show a video that you think your students will enjoy as a fun activity during class. After showing a video, you could ask students questions about it, explain parts they didn’t understand, and use the video as a starting point for a class discussion.

You can also recommend this website to your students as a resource for them to use at home. If you want, you could even give students a homework assignment to watch a certain number of videos per week. For accountability, you could ask them to turn in a short summary or answer a set of questions about the videos they watch.

Research has shown that learners acquire the most language when they listen to something that interests them. Therefore, it is beneficial for students to have a choice in the videos that they watch. I hope to continue adding more and more videos to the website so that it will become easier for students of all different interests to find videos that they truly enjoy.

For more information on teaching with comprehensible input, I recommend the following resources:

"The Wrong Way and the Right Way to Learn a Foreign Language" by Stephen Krashen
https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet/post/the-wrong-and-right-way-to-learn-a-foreign-language/2012/06/16/gJQAK2xBhV_blog.html

"What Everyone Should Know about Second Language Acquisition"
http://learninglanguages.celta.msu.edu/sla-vanpatten/

Tea with BVP, Bill VanPatten’s weekly podcast on second language acquisition:
http://www.teawithbvp.com/

"The Research Supporting the Comprehensible Input Hypothesis and C.I. Instruction"
https://tprsquestionsandanswers.wordpress.com/2014/10/06/the-research-supporting-comprehensible-input/

"How Does Bill VanPatten Describe How We Acquire Language?"
https://tprsquestionsandanswers.wordpress.com/2015/06/22/how-does-bill-vanpatten-describe-how-we-acquire-language/

Submit a Video:

This website is just getting started, and I would love to add more videos to make the site even better. If you have any videos that you have created yourself, please submit them. I would love to share them on the site to help learners improve their English. I am also always looking for videos that are already uploaded on YouTube that can be embedded here on the site, so please let me know if you find videos that seem appropriate for ESL students. If you make videos yourself, do not worry if you don’t have extremely high-quality filming equipment or film editing experience. I film videos using my iPhone 6 and edit them using Wondershare Filmora, a pretty easy-to-use program. Someday, I hope to make more professional-looking videos, but for now, my low-budget filmmaking will have to do!

Videos should follow these guidelines:

  • The videos must be in English and should be easy for learners to understand. If you are recording your own video, try to speak slower than you normally would and use fairly simple language.
  • Videos should not be direct, explicit lessons about a grammar point or set of vocabulary words but instead should simply focus on a particular topic—just like any normal video made for native English speakers, but spoken in easier English. Here are some ideas for topics for videos:
    • How to make a particular type of food or drink
    • A review of a restaurant, store, or product
    • A funny story
    • A tour of your home, garden, or a special place
    • How to make a craft or piece of artwork
    • Tips on any topic (e.g., "How to decorate your home for spring," "5 Ways to Save Money at Costco")
  • Videos should be interesting. The topic of the videos should be something that will be of interest to many people.

Please use the form below to submit a video: